J.S. Park

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Posts tagged with "jesus"

Maybe you’re way further along than you thought you were. Every blip and spurt of righteousness in your life is nothing short of a supernatural God-made miracle, because naturally in our own fleshly skin, we’re incapable of True Good. Before you met Jesus, you didn’t even care about trying to live right or to make a difference or to help people — and if you did care, it was motivated by self-promotion, image maintenance, social standards, and Darwin-esque survival.

But after Jesus, you have the reason of No-Reason, because now you’re lit up by a Person who out of his own initiated love dared to die in your place on the cross and put His Holy Spirit in you to live out your true calling: which is to love him and love others without expecting anything back. You’re re-created with a new heart to care about what God cares about, and the Father is proud even of your stumbles. Any step forward into your purpose is like the birth of a new life: it is momentous, surprising, awesome, and worth celebrating.

- J.S.

Because It Happened

jspark3000:

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Since the resurrection of Jesus Christ really happened, then

1) there’s a heaven, and a hell.

2) we do have victory over sin, now.

3) what we do matters in eternity.

4) we have forgiveness before an all-holy, fearsome, awesome, all-consuming God.

5) we will also be resurrected.

6) every word in the Bible is true.

7) Jesus is everything he said he was, and is.

8 ) everyone else who isn’t following Christ has it wrong.

9) death is not the end. Love awaits.

10) we have to get the good news out.

11) Jesus is coming back for us.

12) the actual Spirit of God lives in those who follow Him.

13) one day all evil will end.

14) a lot of stuff we think that matters doesn’t really matter.

15) miracles can happen.

16) he died for you and for that neighbor you can’t stand.

17) pride, self-esteem, and earning approval doesn’t work.

18) despair, self-loathing, and discouragement also don’t work.

19) you will be called accountable to God.

20) you can be co-heirs with Jesus Christ, and you get his eternal inheritance.

21) you are friends with the Most High.

22) you have a king in another country, and your citizenship is there.

23) you can trade in your self-pity for endless joy.

24) even when it feels like Friday, Sunday is coming.

25) nothing can ever take away your joy, ever.

— J.S.

In darkness,
He rolls the stone away.
At your darkest,
He loves you anyway.

- J.S.

Why Do You Believe In Jesus?

jspark3000:

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Anonymous asked:

Why do you believe in Jesus? I get believing in a creator, but as much as I want to, I can’t always convince myself that there’s evidence for Jesus doing all that stuff, and it breaks my heart because i used to believe it without a problem. I don’t know what to do.

 

Hey dear friend. If you didn’t know, I’m mostly a skeptical Christian, so you might be asking the wrong person.

There are times when I’m really into apologetics, and other times when I just don’t care about apologetics at all. As a wise pastor once said, knowledge is essential but it is not sufficient.

So as much as I can muster with my weak faith, I believe in Jesus for historical, emotional, existential, and intellectual reasons that far outweigh any other system of belief. There is just enough evidence for Christ that each day, I must conclusively doubt my doubts. It’s tough most days, but it’s often enough.

Let’s consider a few things together, and ultimately you can decide to clamp down upon the meat.

 

- Something in the first century made the Jews just go nuts.

The Jewish-Israelite people were dead-set on never ever worshiping another god, ever. It was their first law from God: and even when Caesar claimed divinity or these other “messiahs” came around claiming to be the savior, the Jews never budged. The Romans had constrained the Jewish people by outlawing most religious places unless they were called “schools,” and the Romans threw down all their gods and cultural excess on the Jews, but still: the Jews remained slavishly devoted to Yahweh and never bowing down to any idols, to much social derision and lowered status.

But an event happened where suddenly, the Jewish people had changed their day of worship from Saturday to Sunday. They were claiming the Christ had come and risen. In the eyes of many Jews, this would’ve been downright blasphemous: but whole hordes of Jews were now convinced that Jesus was God. It was such an intense explosive shift that Rome never recovered, and only decades later Christianity became the mainstream faith of the nation.

Something happened two-thousand years ego that history must account for. I know this by itself is not incontrovertible evidence that Jesus did what he did. But scholars are still confounded by this rapid series of events that essentially upturned both the Jewish people and the Roman nation. Once-devout Jews were being lit up and impaled by Nero, being mauled by lions and torn limb-from-limb, families killed and stoned, all to stand for Christ.

What the heck happened then? Did the Jews just lose their dang minds? Maybe. But every historical account that tries to explain all this away ends up piling on more doubt to their own theories. Really the simplest explanation here by way of Occam’s Razor is that Jesus is who he said he was and he did what he said he would.

So Christianity is uniquely alone in that it does NOT claim to be built primarily on teachings, but on a historical event that ripped through a nation. No one wanted Christianity to be true, most in particular the disciples, who all fled. But they turned back because they simply couldn’t deny Jesus had risen. They had seen him. It was the key event that validated all of Jesus’s ministry: not his miracles or teachings or death, but walking out of that grave. Ultimately, over and over, despite my incredulity, I find this to be the most rational explanation for the Jews going nuts. You’d have to make a very convoluted difficult case to explain it any other way.

 

- Jesus’s death and resurrection built an iconoclastic world-upheaving truth that is upheld by the counterintuitive element of grace.

Jesus is existentially satisfying because he accurately describes the human condition and provides the solution. Every other system of belief is built on performance, maintenance, reward/punishment, dichotomous banner-waving division, moralism, superiority, self-improvement, and self-isolated relativism. Jesus destroys all these categories and provides a way above all ways that I have absolutely NOT found in any other system of thinking.

He speaks to my desperate need for self-justification. All day long, I’m justifying myself to prove I’m worthy. I am making myself better than others and comparing my weakness to someone who is weaker than me. I am in a moral race that causes me to laugh at a celebrity’s downfall or to help the poor to look righteous. Jesus destroyed this in the cross by calling us all equally guilty and all equally loved. It was never in us to justify ourselves, but only Jesus can do this.

He speaks equally to my lack of humility and my lack of confidence. Jesus had to die for my sin so I can’t be prideful: but he was glad to die for my sin so I can’t be in despair. Both are somehow true at the same time, and it’s this paradoxical union of tensions that keeps me oriented to a self-forgetting love for others and a right estimation of myself.

He speaks to my need for approval, validation, and significance. Because Jesus loved me enough to die for me: he is the foundation for all the love I need. He knows me and still loves me, and this is the relational intimacy I’ve always been looking for.

He speaks to my need to serve myself and make life about me. I’m set free because my life is not about me. Life is about the story of God and we’re all bit players. Imagine this sort of freedom: when you can quit living selfishly for yourself. You’re no longer enslaved under the tyrannical dictatorship of self. Imagine this sort of Gospel-shaped person who loved you but didn’t need you, because they’re not using you as a vehicle to serve themselves. They’re not killing you as an obstacle who is in the way of their desires. They’re instead seeking to love you simply because they love you and not because of what you can or won’t do for them, and this is because they are loved the same way.

You see: Every other kind of motivation is inherently selfish. It is all seeking a means to an end, one method using another for self-gain. We’re motivated by fear, by conformity, by trophies, by pleasure, by social standing: and while they might benefit a few, they really just benefit me. The love of God is entirely intrinsic unto itself, in a single direction initiated by its own essence, with nothing to gain and no reason to exist except that it does. When we understand such a love: we’re motivated by a purely one-way love to love in the same way, motivated by the reason of no-reason, because it has inherently punctured through our souls. There is no stronger force than this in the entire universe.

I could keep going. The Gospel of Grace is scary as hell, because it means we can no longer work for our own salvation. It means we’re no longer in control of validating our own lives. But when applied rightly, the Gospel of Grace destroys the gap between who we are and who we want to be. It fills in my existential itch to be both loved and known. It usurps my selfish need to justify and hold myself superior. It ruins everything so perfectly.

 

- Even if you don’t believe Jesus is God, we would still be studying the things he said.

Jesus was intellectually subversive and superlative in every single area of thought. The stuff he said was crazy, revolutionary, mindblowing.

To be truthful, most of his teaching is common sense. But the way in which he broke xenophobia and did away with dichotomous dogmatic thinking was nothing short of astonishing.

You can’t pin him down. He was both merciful and full of justice. He was at times liberal and at times conservative. He loved Roman officials as much as he loved prostitutes, swindlers, and murderers. If he were alive today, he would piss off both Fox News and The New Yorker.

There are not many people like this. Almost everyone in history fell to one side of the spectrum or the other. Their thoughts would fall into one pigeonhole or another. We are not a balanced people who can consistently hold two tensions at once: but Jesus did.

I can almost guarantee that G.K. Chesterton was right: if you repackaged Jesus as a Chinese mythology and re-told it to a non-Christian, they would absolutely love it. But because it’s Jesus and Christianity, people hate it.

The more you read about Jesus, the more you get a sense you’re dealing with the divine. You’re not dealing with human words here. He’s not some comfortable therapeutic guru nor a rebel for rebellion’s sake. He’s something altogether in his own category that transcends our comprehensible reality.

I pray you find him, my friend.

 

“My most recent faith struggle is not one of intellect. I don’t really do that anymore. Sooner or later you just figure out there are some guys who don’t believe in God and they can prove He doesn’t exist, and there are some other guys who do believe in God and they can prove He does exist, and the argument stopped being about God a long time ago and now it’s about who is smarter, and honestly I don’t care.”

— Donald Miller

 

"To fall in love with God is the greatest romance;
to seek Him, the greatest adventure;
to find Him, the greatest achievement.”
— St. Augustine

 

— J.S.

jspark3000:

The Gospel, plain and simple.

jspark3000:

The Gospel, plain and simple.

Around The Corner: A Second Wind

jspark3000:

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You’ve been in meltdown before, when the world felt unusually cruel and your insides collapsed and there weren’t enough tears to cry through your heaving convulsing sobs. Like the wind was uppercut out of your soul.

It’s not pretty. Not like the movies. It’s not dramatic or cathartic or ironic or Oscar-worthy — it’s ugly, snot all over, face puckered in fifty places, bowled over with all kinds of noises spewing from your guts.

I was reading John 20, and Mary Magdalene was there too.

Now Mary stood outside the tomb crying.

I read this and grew horribly sad, imagining her hunched over and hopeless. Her world was punched through. I knew how she felt.

The man they called Savior, who had rebuked seven demons out of Mary and had been bathed by her family’s precious perfume, was now just a cold lifeless body in an airtight tomb. Along with his body were the dreams of a different future.


Mary was demon-possessed: so she wasn’t allowed to shop, marry, have friends, go to the Temple, or travel freely. She was one of those fringe losers on the edge of everyone’s radar. Maybe Jesus would’ve changed all that: but they killed him on a dirty wooden cross.

Only — around the corner — something was happening.

The dream was not dead.

She turns to see two angels. They ask why she’s crying. She laments over her Lord, whose body she thinks has been stolen. She doesn’t understand yet.

She turns again and there is a gardener. He asks why she’s crying. She thinks he knows where the body went. She doesn’t understand yet.

Some of us live in this space — we don’t know yet. We are sitting outside a broken dream weeping into our hands and watching the sand fall through tired fingers. It’s gone. We can’t possibly know how it will get better.


God understands this. It’s partly why He sent His Son — to turn back the clock on every fallen grain of sand.

Jesus, in a miraculous meta-cosmic reversal, finished the sentence of humanity with his resurrection. Entropy died. Tragedies no longer defined the end. On the grandest scale, hope weaved itself into broken human hearts and we were revoked every reason to fear.

Then on the smaller scale: for Mary Magdalene, and for you and for me — we await the miracle around the corner.

We lost our dream in a garden once. But the gardener is here.

He is alive: and so now, are we.


It could be that nothing around you gets better. But He is there, extending grace within the swirling mess of a hostile world.

It could be that people around you don’t change. But He is there, growing you to change when others do not.

It could be that you get stuck at that obstacle once more. But He is there, having already removed every obstacle between you and Him at the cross, empowering you for so much better than you think.

In your crushed swollen chest where the hurt pulls in: Christ comes to fill the broken places like so much water in cracked earth, new breath stretching your lungs, so we may thrive and bloom and stand on our shaking feet again.

Turn. He is there.


Because I live, you also will live.

— John 14:19

— J.S.

I wonder how they could yell Barabbas instead of Jesus.
I wonder how they sang Hosanna and days later, Crucify him.
I wonder how Pontius could wash his hands of it, as though a dirty conscience could be so easily cleaned.

But — I am Barabbas, sinner set free.
I yell Crucify him as I sing praises with ease.
I am Pontius, who turned a blind eye to glory.
And yet, so Christ still died for me.
Still he died, where I should be,
a perfect love on that tree.

- J.S.

We live inside Saturday /
Where everything you thought you knew about the Savior
Doesn’t make sense today
Sometimes it feels like it’ll always feel this way
Like the bad guy wins and then he gets away


So I run from the numbness of Saturday
I fall into that space between my sin and my escape –
That cycle of when I do my secret sin in my secret hideaway
I try to break away and make change but I get pulled back into the
empty hurricane of my selfish affliction / directionless
There’s a terrible whisper telling me “This is as good as it gets.”
Running from Saturday’s disappointment
In limbo / regrets on a stretch of narrow highway
Where my dreams, they died on Friday


Jesus / you truly were glorious /
we miss you when you were with us
I think about my life before Christ,
how I used to live for me, myself, and I
and I would do good to look good and get good back in reply


But Jesus, you were so different and unlike the mob /
You seemed so unaffected by human praise and applause
You said you were God / I wasn’t sure but you did roll like a boss


I think of what you taught / about how to treat one another
I think of how I objectified humans as blunt weapons for my secret dirty desires
and planned out my next crime scene like an elaborate diorama
I remember how the ceiling fan would accuse me of guilt / with its every cut into the sides of my lying mouth, from blade to hilt
But you never allowed this shame to overtake me /
You embraced me /
You loved even all the ingredients in me that made me crazy

Jesus / when I met you
I asked myself, “Is it possible to miss someone you never knew?”
Because before I knew You, I knew You, and I missed You
You invoked in me dreams and reflections and longings I could hardly stand to whisper
Now … we just miss you.

-

"Friday / Saturday / Sunday"

Spoken Word sermon by J.S. 

From the perspective of a modern day disciple who was with Jesus in his death and resurrection

(via jspark3000)

Friday / Saturday / Sunday
J.S. Park

jspark3000:

Hello beloved friends!

This is a Spoken Word performance, aka that one time the pastor rapped his sermon. It’s from the perspective of a modern day disciple of Jesus, about the three fateful days after Jesus’s crucifixion and how the chaos of the cross turned into beautiful death-defying glory.

To download directly, click here.

Love y’all and be blessed!

— J

Resurrection = Hope

jspark3000:

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Ten years ago, I went to a funeral for my friend.  He was eighteen years old.  He was stabbed to death in the doorway of his home, and he had died trying to save his sister and his mother. 

He died on the way to the hospital.  When I got the news, I hung up the phone and threw it across the room.  I kicked over a chair and couldn’t stop yelling.

At the funeral, there he was.  An eighteen year old life, cut short, dreams gone, a future inside a box. 

Three months before he died, he and I were at a Christian retreat together.  During one of the services, he received Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior.  I was there when it happened. 

At the funeral — we were able to rejoice.  It was not an easy rejoicing, but we knew he was with Jesus, in a joyous union that we could hardly comprehend.  He’s there now, and ten years has probably felt like ten seconds.

 

I don’t mean to be morbid, but it’s difficult to connect the Resurrection to our daily lives: until you’re at a funeral.  Then it makes sense. 

I’m not saying his death makes sense, or that it doesn’t hurt, or that I fully accept what God is doing all the time.  I’m saying: the Resurrection gives a hope above and beyond all that happens.  It answers our deepest fears about eternity.  If Jesus is alive, then a funeral is not really a funeral — and futures do not stop in a box.

The death of death is the Great Reversal of the human story.  Even those who overcome many obstacles have to die one day.  Jesus reversed inevitability.  He is the True Story of the world.  He made it okay to dream again, even when dreams seem to die.  In the midst of cynicism, Jesus is the “happily ever after” we all secretly long for.

He’s the hope in traffic, in troubled family, in bad grades, in aging, in failed plans, in irreversible mistakes, in overwhelming bills, in second and third chances, in tragic headlines, in our daily struggle.  In the shadow of death, his shadow is greater still. 

Sean: I’ll see you again soon one day. 

Until then: we tell the story.

— J.S.

Everything Is Very Wrong With Everything, And We Know It
J.S. Park

jspark3000:

Hello beloved wonderful friends!

This is the first part of a new sermon series called “Why You Christian?”  It explores the question of why anyone would ever want to be a Christian.

This first message is titled: Everything Is Very Wrong With Everything, And We Know It.

It’s about that Christianese church-word “sin,” and how we all secretly know something is very wrong and all the ways we try to make it right.

Stream above or download here!

 

Some things I talk about are: That moment when you wonder why you ever need to learn calculus or the quadratic equation, the very goofy Christianese words ‘sin’ and ‘wrath,’ that weird dark secret thing we do that no one wants to talk about, how the world tries to save itself through try-more moralism and top-my-feelings therapy, slapping someone in the pulpit, and that time I almost cheated on my fiancé with a Starbucks barista.

Be blessed and love y’all!

— J

Jesus’s death and resurrection built an iconoclastic world-upheaving truth that is upheld by the counterintuitive element of grace.

Jesus is existentially satisfying because he accurately describes the human condition and provides the solution. Every other system of belief is built on performance, maintenance, reward/punishment, dichotomous banner-waving division, moralism, superiority, self-improvement, and self-isolated relativism. Jesus destroys all these categories and provides a way above all ways that I have absolutely NOT found in any other system of thinking.

He speaks to my desperate need for self-justification. All day long, I’m justifying myself to prove I’m worthy. I am making myself better than others and comparing my weakness to someone who is weaker than me. I am in a moral race that causes me to laugh at a celebrity’s downfall or to help the poor to look righteous. Jesus destroyed this in the cross by calling us all equally guilty and all equally loved. It was never in us to justify ourselves, but only Jesus can do this.

He speaks equally to my lack of humility and my lack of confidence. Jesus had to die for my sin so I can’t be prideful: but he was glad to die for my sin so I can’t be in despair. Both are somehow true at the same time, and it’s this paradoxical union of tensions that keeps me oriented to a self-forgetting love for others and a right estimation of myself.

He speaks to my need to serve myself and make life about me. I’m set free because my life is not about me. Life is about the story of God and we’re all bit players. Imagine this sort of freedom: when you can quit living selfishly for yourself. You’re no longer enslaved under the tyrannical dictatorship of self. Imagine this sort of Gospel-shaped person who loved you but didn’t need you, because they’re not using you as a vehicle to serve themselves. They’re not killing you as an obstacle who is in the way of their desires. They’re instead seeking to love you simply because they love you and not because of what you can or won’t do for them, and this is because they are loved the same way.

You see: Every other kind of motivation is inherently selfish. It is all seeking a means to an end, one method using another for self-gain. We’re motivated by fear, by conformity, by trophies, by pleasure, by social standing: and while they might benefit a few, they really just benefit me. The love of God is entirely intrinsic unto itself, in a single direction initiated by its own essence, with nothing to gain and no reason to exist except that it does. When we understand such a love: we’re motivated by a purely one-way love to love in the same way, motivated by the reason of no-reason, because it has inherently punctured through our souls. There is no stronger force than this in the entire universe.

- J.S. from this post

(Source: jspark3000)

Only a love the size of God could ever win over our sin.

- J.S. from this message

In line with your most recent post (or answered question), what would you recommend for those who do their devotions but couldn't understand the metaphors used by Jesus? I usually look up the interpretations online and go from there but I was wondering if there's a better way to go about it. Thank you for your help!

Hey there dear friend, I believe you’re referring to this post.

One book I highly recommend is Henrietta Mears’ What The Bible Is All About.  It’s a very simple commentary with pictures (woo!) and practical explanations of every book in the Bible.  It’s not too specific on any one book, but gives just enough context to help us think through Scripture for ourselves. 

The wider we read, the more we’ll start fitting the pieces too.  I’ve probably read tons of Timothy Keller and C.S. Lewis, and they’ve helped formed my theology just enough to get a foothold in Jesus’s words.  While I don’t mean to make it only a matter of intellect, it does help to read broadly.  That means both diving into Systematic Theology by Wayne Grudem or something light like Max Lucado.

I would also recommend a good huge Study Bible.  My personal favorite is the very classic Zondervan 1984 NIV Study Bible.  The best thing is to browse a few Study Bibles at a bookstore and see which you like.  I’ve seen some friends also like the Life Application and Quest Study Bibles.

May I add: Jesus did say some pretty tough things to figure out.  Scholars still dissect the particulars to this day.  If these really smart people are struggling with them, then a simple-minded person like me will too, and that’s okay.  I think there are probably very simple meanings to all of Jesus’s metaphors, and it would be best to receive the most obvious meaning, then apply it.  I’m sure there’s an infinite amount of wisdom we can receive from every parable, but they can also be easy enough for the five-year-old to understand.  So we want to look into them and always remain curious, but also don’t worry too much if you wrestle with them a bit too.  We can enjoy that process of lifelong discovery.

— J

How Do I Recognize False Prophets?

imageAnonymous asked:

I am really confused, the Bible talks about false prophets and false teachers but I don’t quite understand how to recognize them.

 

Hey my dear friend, I believe there are probably two extremes when it comes to “false prophets” —

1) Anyone who says anything weird is a false lying antichrist scumbag, or

2) As long as you’re positive and you name-drop Jesus, you’re a legit preacher.

But I’ve noticed that —

1) When someone yells false prophet, usually they’re saying, “I disagree with him, therefore he’s the devil,” or

2) We only like preachers who tolerate exactly what I already want to do.

 

Mostly I think we’re both too quick or too slow to say “false prophet.”

We’re too quick to say false prophet because most of us enjoy the surge of self-righteousness in our bowels when we find a point of disagreement, and we feel a divine-messenger-high when we can go after a pastor who does something slightly different than us.

We’re too slow to say false prophet because most of us enjoy watered down preaching that emotionally tickles us and goes down like cotton candy and entertains for a while, as long as we’re not challenged or convicted or have to change anything in our over-privileged comfort zone.

I also think there are some “misinformed” teachers who just don’t have all the information, and they end up misleading others. Other times it’s a tolerance of a certain idea or practice because they’re guilty of it too, and people flock there even when the Bible is expressly against it.  They’ll twist just the one part of Scripture and people will go “Oooh aah” and gravitate to a loophole, because you know, flesh attracts flesh.

Yet here’s what I think in general.  There are very, very few false teachers out there who are purposefully trying to deceive you — but there are ways we latch onto a false idea and get misled, even when it’s not the teacher’s original intention. 

 

I’m not saying it’s always our own fault.  Certainly we need to have very high discernment in all we read and hear.  Obviously there are some false teachers who are sneaking into your wallet and they’re only in it for themselves.  But many people hear what they want to hear.  They’ll say “Yeah false prophet” if they want to dismiss someone, or they’ll say “Oh right on amen” if it fits their own choices. 

Let’s take for example, our dear brother Joshua Harris.  He wrote some books on dating that had really good intentions — purity, intimacy, courtship — but some Christian subcultures latched onto these and drove them to an intolerable extreme. Other subcultures started calling Harris a false prophet.  And while I don’t agree with everything Harris says, it’s unfair to call him “the antichrist” just because his books have spawned some bad ideas.  All good ideas are at the mercy of sinful people.

There is NOT a false prophet lurking in every corner.  The worst false prophet is the sin that deceives us inside our own head.  And to flip that, some of the best prophets can be those who are NOT Christians, but simply extend love like God does.  I wouldn’t endorse all they believe, but what they do is so Christlike that it’s hard to argue. 

So ultimately everyone can be a “false prophet” because we all live in our sin-broken condition, but there is a degree of truth in all of us by the grace of God.  We just need wisdom and discernment to see what really comes from Him. 

 

I’ve been accused of being a false teacher before — but in the end I always find that there are some people who don’t like my idea of grace or that I sometimes use the Bible as allegory (because so did Jesus) and that my God happens to love everyone, including the people they don’t like.  And also, we throw around “false teacher” way too casually, when it’s a huge serious accusation that needs patience and prayer — and maybe we need more grace than that within our Christian circles.

So when a preacher uses tons of Scripture, it doesn’t mean they’re biblical.  If a preacher is super smart and flashy, it doesn’t mean they’re all correct.  If a preacher says a few things you disagree with, it doesn’t mean they’re not worth hearing at all.  And all that is okay.  We can show grace for when people mishandle truth, and we can seek the truth together in grace.

I would very much question everything but land on something.  God wants us to be critical thinkers AND gracious listeners.  It’s unwise to dismiss a whole person based on a single sentence.  There might be a time to do that, but it’s not gracious to constantly grade others on an impossible scale.  It’s also unwise to believe everything a person says, even if you really like that person.  There might be a time to do that too, but God does want us to think for ourselves.

And a last thing. If you conclude that someone really is a false prophet, then instead of demonizing them with a nasty blog post, maybe we could get on our knees and pray for them like crazy. The very few people who are false teachers are also dynamic engaging speakers, so imagine if they repented and decided to get on God’s glory instead of their own. His grace can reach even the worst of us and uppercut us back to truth. And Jesus says you’re the evidence of that.

 

I am sending you out like sheep among wolves. Therefore be as shrewd as snakes and as innocent as doves.

— Matthew 10:16

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.

— Aristotle

— J.S.